Oakridge Cambie Corridor an Area of Hot Debate for Vancouver

City Council members are extremely concerned about the new development by Ivanhoe Cambridge and Westbank Projects in the Cambie area. Recently, the Cambie corridor has been bought up by several big name developers causing great concern for the city’s residents and for the City Council. The plan so far has been to use $1.5 billion to turn the outdated Oakridge Centre mall into a new, technologically advanced miniature city.

While residents like the idea of transforming the old outdated 1955 mall into a centre for entertainment and shopping, others like Green party council member Adriane Carr disapprove. In an effort to push through the idea, the developers led Mrs. Carr and others on the council to believe there would be an allotment of green space on the ground level of the property. However, now that the full plans have been released the truth has been made known. The developers plan to keep the park atop one of the malls buildings instead of on ground level. Mrs. Carr claims she was aware of the rooftop space but believed there would be an additional park space for families to enjoy. It has long been the agreement between the city and developers that green spaces will be provided no matter how large a development ends up being.

Despite the debate, however, the seemingly ancient Oakridge Centre will still be getting an update over the next decade. In fact, transformation would be a more accurate word to describe the changes and advancements that will be made over the next few years. From sustainability to extensive housing options, the Oakridge Centre will be an apartment and housing complex with amenities far superseding those of any other complex in Vancouver. Transportation in the form of extensive bike trails to upgrades for the Canada Line transit to Residential Car co-ops, will all be a part of the new plan.

There will also be 70,000 sq. ft of civic community space that will include a day care centre, an extensive 25,000 sq. ft library, and various physical fitness spaces. There will be little to no need to leave the city centre for permanent residents.

While the wait may be quite a while, developers expect it to be finished by 2025, the time will undoubtedly fly by and once here Oakridge will be more than just two anchor stores as it is now. It will be a renovated and updated mini-city that workers and their families can use for all of life’s joys and necessities.